Beeminder and Self-Tracking: Five Months In

So back in January, I started using a little service called Beeminder to track my goals and encourage me to do more things I’ve been putting off. I also experimented with several other Quantified Self tools, and learned a lot about  how simply tracking what we do day to day can open our eyes to things we need to improve at and things we perhaps do too much of (for me, its instant messaging with my friends). It’s been five months since I started this journey of learning about myself, and I thought I’d give an update about how its been going.

My findings: I couldn’t be happier with the results.

I know its easy to get started on a new diet or workout program and feel all motivated and enthusiastic at first. That’s how New Year’s resolutions start, after all. We get all excited about changing our lives and then a few days or weeks later, its back to the same old same old. When I started tracking myself and using Beeminder for my goals, I was afraid a similar thing would happen. It’s just a fad, I thought. My newest obsession. It will subside in a few weeks. I’m happy to say that five months later, I am still going strong and I have made  a lot of progress.

Wait, what is all this Beeminder/Quantified Self stuff? What are you talking about?

Glad you asked. I did a post on all this stuff a few months ago called Quantifying the Self and discussed the nuts and bolts of all this, but here’s a quick review:

Beeminder is a web service that allows you to track your goals by plotting progress points on a graph each day. You try to stay on “the yellow brick road” (that is, the goal you set for yourself — say, doing 20 pushups a day) and if you fall off the road, in order to recommit and get back on the road you pledge money (you’re basically “betting” that you will be able to keep up with your goal). If you fall off the road again, you pay up. Here’s a picture:

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As you can see, the data points are staying above the yellow line, meaning I am on track for my goal. This screenshot was taken back in February, after I had been tracking my reading habits for only a month. Let’s take a look at my graph now:

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There are a lot more data points, and I’ve racked up over 2000 minutes read (that’s 9 books) since January! There are a few flat parts (in March I did a lot of traveling and didn’t find a lot of time to read), and because of this I actually derailed once. But I pledged my $5 and so far I’ve been doing well once again. I really enjoy seeing the graph and the data points grow, and the Android App has been absolutely essential to my success. It doesn’t get much easier than entering in a few numbers into the app every day.

Of course, this is just my most successful graph. I have others that I have utterly failed at, like flossing my teeth:

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This one…has a lot more flatlining. A product of good old akrasia. As you can see, I’ve derailed on this one and have been for quite some time…I think I’m about ready to pony up the cash and try again though (for real this time!) Some people have told me that paying the service money when you fail your goals seems cruel or manipulative on their part, but I don’t see it that way at all. This is something want to do, and if I don’t follow through with it, then there has to be some sort of pain associated with that to deter me from failing again. And besides, this company has done so much for me and I use the service so much I am happy to give them a few bucks here and there. The staff is great and responsive and the website is always getting updates. They deserve it.

In addition, I’ve found from my pedometer app on my phone that I’ve walked over 600,000 steps this year! That’s over 300 miles. The day to day walking may not seem like much, but adding it all up like that certainly has a big impact on me and motivates me to keep going and do more.

My most recent project involves taming the beast that is my email inbox. I’ll admit it: I’m an email hoarder. While other people keep their inboxes neat, tidy, and organized, I have a giant deluge of thousands of emails just sitting there, taking up space and making it impossible to find anything. Usually, if I don’t find an email interesting (such as an advertisement or a newsletter) I won’t even click on it. Thus, there are hundreds of unread emails as well. This is a product of my laziness over time, and it just keeps getting worse. I’ve decided its finally time to do something about it. I set up a Beeminder goal to track my inbox size, and I’m going to either file away or delete 500 emails per week until my inbox reaches the fabled Inbox Zero. Once I reach that milestone, the challenge will be to keep it there, and keep my email inbox manageable and not overflowing like it was before. This leads to less stress, easier location of important emails, and if something is in the inbox, it means I need to deal with it right away. I feel like this will give great gains in productivity and overall happiness.

And just in the interest of transparency, my goals are all publicly viewable on my beeminder page, and that makes me not accountable to just one person, but the internet at large when you display your successes and failures in this way. There’s something strangely motivational about that.

What have I learned?

As for some of the other services, they didn’t stick quite as well. But the trial period of testing out these new things definitely taught me a lot about how my mind works and how we can battle this beast of distraction and bad judgement that rears its ugly head daily. Humans aren’t necessarily rational creatures by nature, but we can learn what mistakes we make and how our minds try to trick us. Then we can trick it right back. I just bought the book Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, and it discusses at length these “cognitive biases” and ways to get around them. The result? A happier, healthier, more productive life.

Final Thoughts

If you’re curious about what self-tracking can do for you, I urge you to try tracking a simple thing in your life, something you already do, for just a week. It becomes like a game to try to “beat your best score” and its really fulfilling to see your progress over time. I really recommend trying this to anyone that is interested in achieving their goals and improving their life. It’s surely changed mine.

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Quantifying the Self

So I’ve been doing a bit of an experiment this year. Sure, everyone says they want to do this or do that, lose weight, eat better, exercise more, etc, but how do we keep ourselves to these goals? As you may be aware, the you of the future is always a bit more conscientious than the you of today: “I’ll eat  ice cream today and go on the diet tomorrow”, “Just one more day of sleeping in and I’ll get up early tomorrow.” The list goes on. Now being the geek that I am, I began to wonder if there were a more scientific way to go about all this.

Something that I’ve found that is pretty easy to do and had a big impact is simply tracking the things you want to do with your time and see how it stacks up over time. I started when I found a website called Beeminder. You can start as many “goals” as you like, such as “go to the gym twice a week” or “floss every day”. You know, those things we want to do but have a hard time actually doing. You go in and plot a data point each day and you can see your progress towards the goal. It has a “yellow brick road” for you to follow and if you do more than average one day you get “safe days” where you don’t have to work as hard. It’s really engaging to me to see my graphs grow.

Another main point of Beeminder is the concept of commitment contracts. As far as I know, this is optional, but I can see how it would definitely improve motivation. Have you ever given $20 to a friend and said “I’m going to try to do <insert thing here>. If I succeed give me my money back, but if I don’t you can keep it.” Basically what you can do with Beeminder is “bet” that you will achieve your goal. You go along and plot your points and if at any point you fall below the “yellow brick road” of success, then you have to pay up. Stay on the road? No payment. Another feature to help you stick to it is that for each time you get “off the road”, the penalty increases. The idea is that at some point you think, “wow, I really don’t want to lose x amount of money, I better go to the gym/eat healthier/read more.” Now that may seem like a pretty negative motivational technique, but think about it this way. No one is forcing you to do anything. These are things that you claim you want to do. The phenomenon that causes us to put off things we want to do is called akrasia. It happens when you go to the store intending to buy vegetables and then you see your favorite ice cream on sale. It happens to all of us, and one of the best ways to stop it is to consciously track what you do and hold yourself accountable for it.

As an example, here’s one of my Beeminder graphs for reading more often. I’ve been saying for years I’d like to read more, but I always seem to find other things to do instead. By tracking my reading time each day, I can see my progress over time and its really helped me to stick with it. I started out with a goal of reading 15  minutes each day, but soon bumped it up to 20, and now I’m at 25. I’ve been reading nearly every day and it feels great. I have finished The Alchemist and I’m almost done with The Hobbitwhich is more than I can usually say I’ve read 2 months into the year!

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But I started to think, after using Beeminder for a while, what other things can I track? I started using a pedometer to see how many steps I walk at my university daily, and boy was I surprised! I usually walk 3 miles or more in a day just walking around to classes, to eat, to meetings, and to work. The steps add up quick, and its really neat to see what my trends are for walking as well. I haven’t been tracking this one for as long, but here’s a graph I created using google spreadsheets: (guess which data points are the weekends…heh. Of course, the pedometer is on my phone so it only tracks wherever I carry it around, which is not usually within my apartment).

Walking Graph

If you’re more interested in tracking your mental fluctuations rather than your physical activities, I uncovered the site Quantified MindIt has a series of experiments where you can track your reaction time, memory, focus, and other basic mental skills. You simply log in and play a few simple games and it gives you scores. There is a wide variety of different activities you can do and I find it pretty fun. I have just started playing around with this site but I imagine if you kept with it and gathered enough data you could determine trends of when your brain is at its best and use that to your advantage. They also have experiments that ask questions like “Does coffee improve cognitive performance?” (tested by doing the games after drinking coffee one day, no coffee the next). Another experiment tests the age old motto of “Never skip breakfast” and asks users to test themselves on days when they have eaten breakfast and days they have not eaten breakfast. They even have one to test the effect that sex has on mental functioning! Finally, if you’re so inclined you can make your own experiments to test out whatever you want.

But why stop there? Some ideas that I have for tracking myself in the future include plotting my going to sleep/wake up times and the time I spend working on my thesis (if you’re curious about that, see here.) I know for me, implementing self tracking into my life has really opened my eyes to a lot of things I do (and don’t do!) and if you’re tired of not meeting your goals or just a huge data nerd like I am, I highly recommend you give this a try. If you have any questions or ideas please leave them in the comments!

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Day 11: On Burnout

So I was thinking about things this weekend. I came to the conclusion that I really have way too much on my plate. I’m stressed out and busy all the time, but I don’t know what I can cut or do better to ease this. I have a history of overcommitting myself, and its coming back to bite me in the butt once again. Let’s see, to start with, I’m taking 17 credit hours of classes, along with about 15 hours per week of work, I volunteer at the high school robotics club on Wednesday afternoons, I often drive my roommate to and from work because she can’t get around easily, and somehow I’m supposed to find time to study and do homework in there as well. Let’s not start on graduate school applications (I don’t want to talk about it…) Oh yeah, and having some time to eat and sleep would be nice too.

I’ve tried managing my time better, I’ve tried doing my most important work during my best hours of the day (I have learned I can’t get *anything* done if I’m sleepy). I just can’t seem to find anything that works for me. I guess I should probably drop the robotics club but I need something that seems relevant for my grad school applications that I’m having a miserable time completing. Everything just seems really overwhelming right now. I’ll get back on track tomorrow, or the next day maybe. I’ll be fine. I just feel like I am constantly going and going and I can’t seem to find a break. Winter break can’t come quickly enough.

Day 4: Birthday Thoughts

Welcome back for day 4 of my NaBloPoMo, in which I’m writing one post each day for the month of November. Today is my birthday, and as such I did a bit of personal introspection regarding things I have done over the last year and things I would like to do differently in the next year. Today I am 22 years old. Most would say that’s still pretty young, but for me I feel like I’ve already seen a quarter of my life go by. It’s disheartening to think back on these 22 years of life and realize that wow, I really haven’t done much with myself. I know  people that are much younger and much more successful than I am, already. It makes me feel like perhaps I’m doing something wrong, but I’ve been trying the best I can to work hard and do well.

One thing that I’ve been having a lot of trouble with lately is concentration. My attention span is shot, I can’t stay interested in things, and its becoming increasingly difficult for me to focus on school stuff or even stuff that I want to do. You might say, well that’s normal, everyone gets distracted or procrastinates sometimes, but its really been hindering my quality of work lately. I’ve read all the advice, made plans, tried to work better, but nothing seems to be working. I’m afraid I’m going to fall off the wagon with this blogging challenge too, but I’m determined to keep it up so far. It’s just disappointing, because I can’t seem to finish things that I start and I just get distracted so easily now, its hurting my school life and with me applying for graduate school programs, that’s not a good thing at all. I guess I’ve had a lot on my mind stress-wise what with the grad school thing. I just hope I can pull out of this slump soon.

Sorry for a personal rant of a post again, have been really busy this weekend and also (if you couldn’t tell) have been in a down sort of mood. I still plan to update this blog each day as I go on. Stay tuned for your regularly scheduled math/science posts in the future.

(Day 2) TwitLit: Classic Literature, 140 characters at a time

Hello and welcome to Day 2 of my NaBloPoMo! Yesterday I talked about the idea of writing a blog post a day all month as a bit of a writing challenge for me.

Today, I’m going to talk about an idea for a programming project that I’ve had, but it has not come to fruition yet. This will be the first of a few “idea dumps” in which I attempt to express my ideas about future projects or things that I find interesting.

In today’s world of ever-connectedness and instant gratification, many people feel that they don’t have time to just sit down and read anymore. But these same people you can see posting on facebook and twitter for a considerable amount of time each day. What if we could turn this around and use social networking and the culture of short and sweet bytes of information to our advantage? What if you could actually *gasp* learn something just from following a twitter account?

My idea for today is for what I’d call TwitLit: Classic Literature 140 Characters at a time. TwitLit is a bot that interacts with twitter to automatically post a 140 character selection from a work of classic literature each day (or possibly, every few hours or so). People who find they “can’t get around to reading” or who have trouble staying focused on long periods of reading can follow the account and although it may take a while, can eventually “read” a book, just by checking the twitter feed.

The implementation details of this are still a bit fuzzy to me, mostly because I literally just thought of this idea yesterday, but I think I’d like to work in Python for this. Some books are really long and it would be difficult to complete a “reading” 140 chars at a time for something like War and Peace, but perhaps shorter books or poetry would work better, as a proof of concept. A bit of preliminary research shows that “Twitterature” has been done before, but from what I can tell, they condense the works into just a few tweets. If I find some spare time in the next few days, maybe I’ll start working on this. What work should I start with?

My Productivity Secret Weapon

So I’m in school again, and I happen to be taking a lot of humanities courses this semester. Not really want I want at all, but hey its what I need to graduate. Having these sorts of classes means that there are lots of reading assignments to go along with them. I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time paying attention through long, dry readings especially in a class I couldn’t care less about.

However, during the last few days, I’ve discovered something useful that allows me to spend time I would otherwise be idle to complete (or at least get a crack at) these readings. The answer is:

THE BUS.

Now let me explain. I live in an apartment, and to get to my campus I ride on a bus about 25 minutes each way. I also spend time waiting for the bus to arrive when I’m both coming and going. During this time, it’s easy to pull out an article or book and start on the readings. I’m not doing anything else, only waiting, and there are no distractions or other things I could be doing really, besides just waiting. Now this may sound like obvious advice, and it probably is, but reading while waiting on the bus and while riding the bus can add up to an hour of reading time per day that I didn’t have before.

So if you commute via public transportation, definitely make use of your time to do some things you’ve been putting off before. I find it a lot harder to procrastinate on a bus than lounging around in my bedroom, so it works. And I don’t know about you, but I really like that.